Architecture It’s funny how viewing an object can trigger long forgotten memories. Such is the case of the brutalist style wall hanging purchased recently for my vintage shop. Created by Finesse Originals during the 70s, it features a fiberglass rendering of a fisherman pulling his net from the water. The strong jagged lines of the fisherman along with the rugged and dark backdrop of the hanging brought be me back to my late teens where I often found myself immersed in the shadowy underworld of the drug culture. Images of a dragon ring that Lee had given to me as a present during one of my visits to his earthy smelling basement pad in order to ( continue reading... )

The Cocktail Nation

The Cocktail Nation: A Singular Vision

Episode 308    Apr 13th 2014

Like many of the listeners of the Cocktail Nation I just love mid-century modern architecture. This week we talk of a giant of MCM in that of Harry Seidler. We talk men’s accessories along with the passing of a Hollywood legend. There’s some new releases to be checking out and I have some of the best parties from across the globe to attend.

Architecture What better epitomizes the visionary futuristic-utopia of the 20th century than the Jetsons? Created in 1962 the prime-time animated sitcom took place in 2062… looking 100 years into the future. Besides the futuristic gadgets and gizmos-surely ahead of their time-the architectural influence is clearly that of Googie design. Including “upswept roofs, curvaceous, geometric shapes, and bold use of glass, steel and neon, Googie was also characterized by space-age designs that depict motion, such as boomerangs, flying saucers, atoms and parabolas, and free-form designs such as ‘soft’ parallelograms and the ubiquitous artist’s-palette motif.” (Source) Two prominent Googie designs clearly inspired the ( continue reading... )


Architecture The origins of “Googie” design can be traced back to the actual coffee shop designed by architect John Lautner and by the works of his contemporaries. Appearing first in commercial buildings and used primarily in designing restaurants, coffee shops, motels, gas stations and bowling alleys, as well as schools, churches, shopping centers and airline terminals, this style of design was directed at the masses for ( read more... )

Architecture The recent exhibit of Deborah Aschheim’s drawings and architectural installations at Edward Cella A+A focused attention to the iconic modernist landmarks of Southern California that once represented the future. Aschheim’s works documented these structures, once the symbols of Southern California’s utopian dreams, which are now forlorn, crumbling commercial towers, buildings, and centers. Treated for the most part as “unacclaimed” monuments of a distant era, Ascheim ( read more... )

Architecture The Brick House have visited a couple who have done a fantastic job of redecorating and restoring their home back to its original style and feel. Located in the high desert of Southern California, they invites us to a house tour. Jill and T.K. have been DIYing the crap out of their mid century pad for the past six years and while it’s still a ( read more... )

Architecture The JFK Trans World Airlines (TWA) terminal was designed by the great Eero Saarinen. Built in a very modernist and expressionistic style it was finished in 1962 and set the standard for how modern jet travel was perceived back in its glory days. The Museum of the City of New York had a exhibition about Mr. Saarinens works back in November and December 2009, which ( read more... )