Ultra Swank - Retro Adventures

A Tour of the Sterling Cooper & Partners Office

Written by Christopher • October 14th, 2014
A Tour of the Sterling Cooper & Partners Office

The storefront system essentially replicates the Time & Life Building’s — Photography by Eric Laignel

Ever wondered what it would be like to work at Sterling Cooper & Partners along Don Draper and Peggy Olsen? Are you an admirer of the mid-century furniture, wallpaper and design? Well, look no further. Ultra Swank has jetted off to New York to take a tour of the latest incarnation of the home of Mad Men… and women.

Both the agency’s name, look and location has changed over the years, but the iconic and impeccable mid-century style of it remains. From the color scheme, to the modernist furniture, to the the art, to the ball lights. This is really a dream for any fan of Joseph Eichler and other Mid-Century modern (MCM) architects and designers that era.

The agency was originally known as just Sterling Cooper, founded by Roger Sterling and Bertram Cooper. A change was made in December 1963 when it became clear that power agency McCann Erickson was going to purchase Puttnam, Powell and Lowe which had acquired Sterling Cooper Advertising agency not long before.

In May 1968, it was decided to merge the newly founded Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce (SCDP) and competitor Cutler Gleason and Chaough (CGC) as a means of attracting Chevrolet to a larger agency. CGC moved its personnel to the SCDP office at 1271 Avenue of the Americas, Manhattan, New York City. Later that year, the new firm was officially named Sterling Cooper & Partners (SC&P) and this is what the current revision of their offices look like.

Which is your favorite part or detail of the office?

Source Interior Design   

Above: Paneling in the reception area imitates walnut — Photography by Eric Laignel

Above: A custom Florence Knoll–style sofa and matching chair anchor the account-executive lounge at the agency. — Photography by Eric Laignel

Above: New teak veneer tops the vintage table in the conference room — Photography by Eric Laignel

Above: Joan Harris visiting Don Draper’s office — Photography courtesy of Ron Jaffe/AMC

Above: Secretarial desks are reproductions — Photography by Eric Laignel

Above: Another office — Photography by Eric Laignel

Above: A licensed copy of a Mark Rothko painting hangs in Bert Cooper’s office — Photography by Eric Laignel

Above: A smaller office with a vintage typewriter — Photography by Eric Laignel

Above: Chaough’s office’s ’60’s-esque wallpaper — Photography by Eric Laignel

Above: The phone booth in the elevator lobby — Photography by Eric Laignel

Above: Jim Cutler and Stan Rizzo speed past — Photography courtesy of Jordin Althaus/AMC

Above: Magazines that the ad men use for research — Photography by Eric Laignel

Above: Outside the reception — Photo courtesy of ABC News

Above: Welcome to Sterling Cooper & Partners — Photo courtesy of ABC News

Above: The conference room — Photo courtesy of ABC News

Above: The reception of SC&P — Photo courtesy of ABC News

Above: Another angle of Peggy Olson’s office

Above: Peggy Olson’s office, senior copywriter — Photo courtesy of ABC News

Above: The kitchen, where many cups of coffee are made — Photo courtesy of ABC News

Above: Vintage candy machine — Photo courtesy of ABC News

Above: Sterling Cooper & Partners press release — By Peggy Olson

Above: The SCP floorplan as of season 4. The second floor was added the following season. — Courtesy of Cerpin Taxt

Christopher

Christopher founded Ultra Swank in 2005. Has a crush on mid-century graphic design, defunct airlines, Disneyland and the Century 21 Exposition. Is a collector of easy listening music from the 60s and 70s and a Swedish expat living in Barcelona, Spain.

Find out more about Christopher

  • Caz

    Um, where are the stairs in the floor plan… and the second floor?

  • The floorplan was made before the second floor was added.

  • Isn’t the amusingly titled ‘Whisky Storage’ room actually Bert Cooper’s office?

  • Pingback: Architecture: A Tour of the Time & Life Building in the 1960s | Ultra Swank()

  • tempo150101

    They didn’t have that kind of drop ceiling tile in the 1960’s. The drop ceiling would have had a popcorn finish to it and would be flush with the ceiling grid. And that’s if they even used a grid ceiling. They were still using those 12″x12″ square ceiling tiles back in those days that were a real pain in the butt to remove.

    The recessed flourescent lighting was around in the 1960’s but the metal egg-crate grills were more common and it had a more ugly yellow hue. As a matter of fact, I don’t think the plastic lenses on those recessed lights were very good back then. I remember seeing a lot of yellowed lenses back in my youth.

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